architecture

Do you have a thing for architecture? How about weird architecture? Well you’re in luck!

Finding weird, bizarre and unusual stuff online is quite easy. Just look at Strangebuildings.com. They have a collection of the world’s most unusual architecture, ranging from weird to weirder.

Bored of the usual touristy stuff when you travel? Maybe you can try visiting these unique architectural feats next time.

Source: Bored Panda and strangebuildings.com

1. Wooden Gagster House (Archangelsk, Russia)

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Photo Credit: deputy-dog.com via strangebuildings.com

2. Forest Spiral (Darmstadt, Germany)

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Photo Credit: Kikos Dad via strangebuildings.com

3. Wonderworks (Pigeon Forge, TN, USA)

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Photo Credit: Rusl?k via strangebuildings.com

4. Eden Project (United Kingdom)

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Photo Credit: wikipedia

5. The Church of Hallgrimur, Reykjavik, Iceland

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Photo Credit: Stuck in Customs via strangebuildings.com

6. Ideal Palace (France)

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Photo Credit: Mélisande*

7. House Attack (Vienna, Austria)

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Photo Credit: Dom Dada via strangebuildings.com

8. Conch Shell House, Isla Mujeres, Mexico

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Photo Credit: Mark Stadnik via strangebuildings.com

9. National Theatre (Beijing, China)

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Photo Credit: Azure Lan via strangebuildings.com

10. The National Library (Minsk, Belarus)

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Photo Credit: .magullo. via strangebuildings.com

11. Nautilus House (Mexico City, Mexico)

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Photo Credit: strangebuildings.com

12. Olympic Stadium (Montreal, Canada)

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Photo Credit: Wikipedia via strangebuildings.com

13. Casa da musica (Porto, Portugal)

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Photo Credit: Osvaldo Gago

14. Museum of Contemporary Art (Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

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Photo Credit: strangebuildings.com

15. Cathedral of Brasilia (Brazil)

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Photo Credit: = xAv = via strangebuildings.com

16. Lotus Temple (Delhi, India)

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Photo Credit: MACSURAK via strangebuildings.com

17. Stone House (Guimarães, Portugal)

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Photo Credit: Jsome1 via strangebuildings.com

18. The Crooked House (Sopot, Poland)

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Photo Credit: brocha via strangebuildings.com

19. Mind House (Barcelona, Spain)

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Photo Credit: angelocesar

20. Guggenheim Museum (Bilbao, Spain)

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Photo Credit: disgustipado via strangebuildings.com

21. Kansas City Library (Missouri, USA)

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Photo Credit: jonathan_moreau via strangebuildings.com

22. Atomium (Brussels, Belgium)

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Photo Credit: /*dave*/ via strangebuildings.com

23. Habitat 67 (Montreal, Canada)

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Photo Credit: ken ratcliff via strangebuildings.com

24. Cubic Houses (Kubus woningen) (Rotterdam, Netherlands)

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Photo Credit: sarmax via strangebuildings.com

25. The Museum of Play (Rochester, USA)

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Photo Credit: Mike.Hanlon via strangebuildings.com

Tree houses are no longer just for kids!

Author Philip Jodidio published a book through Taschen that showcases 50 of the most incredible tree houses ever built. Imagine living in an alien ship inspired house like the ones found in Sweden or spend a quiet afternoon sipping tea mid-air amongst cherry blossoms in Japan. Each structure is an architectural wonder and is sure to bring out the kid even in adults!

The hard cover coffee table book entitled “Tree Houses: Fairy Tale Castles in the Air covers a variety of tree house architectural styles from traditional to modern.

It’s a childhood fantasy meets grown-up savour faire.

Below is a taste of what the book has to showcase. Special mention to that Mirrorcube Tree Hotel in Sweden, it has the ability hide amongst the foliage especially when the lights are off!

Source: My Modern Met

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Terunobu Fujimori, Teahouse Tetsu, Kiyoharu Shirakaba Museum, Nakamaru, Hokuto City, Yamanashi (Japan)

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Roderick Wolgamott Romero, Lake-Nest Tree House, New York (USA)

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Tree House in the southwest of Irian Jaya (Indonesia)

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Lukasz Kos, 4tree house, Walker’s Point, Lake Muskoka Ontario (Canada)

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Tham & Videgård Arkitekter, Mirrorcube Tree Hotel, Harads (Sweden)

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baumraum, Andreas Wenning, Between Alder and Oak, Osnabrück (Germany)

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Casa na Árvore, Lake House, Araras, São Paulo (Brazil)

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Tom Chudleigh, Free Spirit Spheres, Qualicum Bay, British Columbia (Canada)

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Pacific Environments, Yellow Tree House Restaurant, Warkworth (New Zealand)

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baumraum, Andreas Wenning, Jungle House

Photo Credit: Philip Jodidio via My Modern Met

New York design company STPMJ recently came up with a site-specific architectural folly that showcases a seamless integration of architecture and nature folly that reflects and merges the surrounding landscape.

The project called Invisible Barn was conceived from an original proposal submitted to the popular Folly competition. The way it works is that a parallelogram-shaped structure is designed specifically to stand in the middle of a dense grove of trees located in the Socrates Sculpture Park. The structure is made mainly of wood and sheeted with mirror film. The effect is a uniquely bizarre piece of art wherein the barn becomes one with nature as its exterior reflects the surrounding birch trees, blue sky and signs of the changing seasons.

From a fair distance, the structure looked oddly invisible-like as each inch of man made architectural presence is erased by the reflection. Visitors are given the chance to experience a unique sense of interaction as they maneuver in and out of the structure through the visible incisions in its mirrored surface.

The architects of the Invisible Barn explain that the installation is meant to re-contextualize the landscape of the park, which is made possible by projecting the surrounding scenery onto the surface of the structure.

The project description aptly describes the installation:

The visual illusion that blurs the perceptual boundary between the folly and the site, allows the folly to e disappeared and invisible in nature, reconstructing the landscape of the site.

Source: My Modern Met

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Photo Credit: My Modern Met

 

Wouldn’t it be awesome if your house has secret rooms and passages?

Whether they were built for safety, work or play, secret rooms have an undeniable mystique and appeal to them. Ancient Egyptians have always been known to have a thing for secret rooms and hidden passages as evidenced in the great pyramids that these ancient architects built to confuse robbers from getting into its treasure rooms. Even monarchs and rulers are known to live in buildings equipped with a secret passageway leading to a secret room or most popularly known as a panic room.

Secret rooms can both provide a safe haven for you and your family in case of emergencies, or they can either be a fun or cozy nook to hide away from the rest of the world.

Source: Bored Panda

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Photo Credit: home-reviews.com

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Photo Credit: hiddenpassageway.com

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Photo Credit: smartproducttechnology.com

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Photo Credit: hiddenpassageway.com

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Photo Credit: dailymail.co.uk

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Photo Credit: stashvault.com

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Photo Credit: houzz.com

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Photo Credit: thejoinery.com

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Photo Credit: how-do-it.info

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Photo Credit: houzz.com

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Photo Credit: eckelmanbros.wordpress.com

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Photo Credit: houzz.com

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Photo Credit: newyorknyhomeowner.com

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Photo Credit: mapleseedrenovation.wordpress.com

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Photo Credit: mouzz.com

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Photo Credit: karinweiborg.com

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Photo Credit: imgur

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