children

We’ve heard it before, “kids say the darndest things.”

We can blame it to kids’ ignorance to social norms, their innocent lack of understanding on how the real world works (check out the kid expecting a pony from Santa) or the fact that well, they are kids. Below is a hilarious list of things said by kids to their parents, teachers and would-be boyfriends.

Silly as they may all sound, these notes are sure to make you giggle. Straight from that kid informing the tooth fairy how much she owes him to that one adorable answer on a test saying that one shouldn’t hit dogs, let our collection of honest to goodness notes from kids put a smile on your face.

Enjoy!

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Having someone in the family who is sick, especially of a terminal disease, can be really hard for the children. It isn’t always easy to explain to a child the repercussions of having such illness and having to tell them that you are sick can be one of the hardest conversations you can have with them.

Photo by Maureen Abood of www.maureenabood.com/

Photo by Maureen Abood of www.maureenabood.com/

From the book The Silver Lining: A Supportive and Insightful Guide to the Realities of Breast Cancer by Hollye Jacobs, below is a fairly simple list on what you must do when you are left with no choice and have to tell your kid or kids that you are sick.

1. Always prepare for the conversation. You can do this by writing down the important points and even rehearsing them if you must. Also, the simpler your wordings are, the easier your kid will understand what you are trying to convey.

2. It doesn’t hurt to plan where and when you will have the conversation. It is suggested to have it when your kids are most awake and really capable of focusing on the matter at hand.

3. It is crucial that your kid or kids will not feel like they are spoken down to. Be at eye level with them. A great idea is to have them sit on your lap.

4. Always have an introductory sentence before going ahead and telling them the crux of the matter. Something in the lines of: “I have something very important and sad news to tell you.”

5. Never back out. Just take a deep breath and tell them. Remember that it will be harder to know the truth from someone else, so it is better that you tell him or her the sad news yourself.

6. You can seek the advice of a professional, like a social worker, nurse or counselor if you are still unsure on how you’re going to go about with your wording. Using developmentally appropriate language can help a lot.

7. Make sure to speak in a clear, calm, unhurried and confident voice. Show them that you are strong even if the news you are telling them is sad and heartbreaking. It also helps to use simple words and short sentences so it will be easier for them to catch up on what you are trying to explain.

8. Always start with the basic information that they need to know as your child will soon start questioning you and that’s when you can explain the news further to them based on their questions and how they are trying to understand the situation.

9. Make sure to encourage feedback from them, especially questions. Also, answer with all honesty. If there is a question that you cannot answer, be honest with them and tell them that you will get back at them with the right answer.

10. Prepare yourself for follow-up conversations. Children will process he information you just gave them piece-by-piece. They will continue to ask questions about it through time.

11. You can use a variety of communication techniques to further explain to them the situation like that of books, games, art, music and movies. These will encourage dialogue and expression.

12. You can go ahead and tell them what you feel. For example, you can tell them that you are sad and confused, but make sure to reassure them that you can go through it together. This is a healthy coping mechanism that you can practice.

13. Communicating with their teachers and school counselors are also important as they can help support your children when in school.

 Source: Woman’s Day

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