food

Titanium

15

Found in some non-dairy creamers, icing and white salad dressing.

Photo Credit: http://images-of-elements.com/

Beetles

14

Carmine is actually ground up red beetle shells, used to dye red some of your favorite red-colored foods.

Photo Credit: https://pbs.twimg.com/

Beaver…Stuff

13

Vanilla ice cream and some raspberry-flavored foods are really yummy…thanks to the anal gland secretions and urine coming from beavers. Yup.

Photo Credit: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/

Bones

12

Charred animal bones is used in white sugar to filter it of any color impurities.

Photo Credit: http://cdn2.bigcommerce.com/

Jell-o

11

What makes jell-o stick? Collagen made from the connective tissue that holds animal bones together.

Photo Credit: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/

Fish Bladders

10

What gives some of your favorite beer its golden yellow color? You guessed it right – fish bladders.

Photo Credit: http://alimentazione.letteradonna.it/

Sheep’s Oily Secretions

9

You’ve already chewed on this – it’s listed as lanolin in your chewing gum label.

Photo Credit: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/

Duck Feathers and Human Hair

8

If you have a thing for big-label bagged bread, then you’ve already eaten some of these in the form of a cooked down amino acid.

 

Photo Credit: http://blog.safetytubs.com/

Sand

7

You like fast food? Then most likely you’ve eaten sad, or silicon dioxide as they call it.

Photo Credit: http://hikaliber.files.wordpress.com/

Sawdust

5

The next time you buy shredded cheese, read the label for an ingredient called cellulose. That’s sawdust, used to prevent the shreds from sticking together.

 

Photo Credit: http://i921.photobucket.com/

 

 Calf Stomach

6

Without processed calf stomach called rennet, milk won’t turn into cheese. So there.

 

Photo Credit: http://doc.501pets.com/

Phosphoric Acid

4

You know that stuff used by gangsters in movies to dissolve bodies? Well manufacturers also use it in soda, that’s what gives your drink its acidity.

 

Photo Credit: http://pixel.nymag.com/

Borax

 

3

Yes, that’s your typical household cleaner…and caviar preservative.

Photo Credit:  http://3.bp.blogspot.com/

 Coal Tar

2

Listed among the “dangerous goods” identified by the UN, this is commonly used to dye candy, soda and other food products red.

Photo Credit: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/

Pink Slime

1

This yummy looking candy stuff is what a lot processed fast food meat is made of, like your chicken nuggets and hamburgers.

Photo Credit: http://img.gawkerassets.com/

 

Below is a list of 27 food fails – from sorry looking cookies to inedible attempts to food as simple as mac ‘n cheese.

Source: Buzzfeed Food 

This microwave cookie fiasco...

This microwave cookie fiasco…

Photo Credit: @bananieannie / instagram.com

This almost-ombré cake...

This almost-ombré cake…

Photo Credit: @hannahrmoody / instagram.com

This incredible, edible sinking sponge cake...

This incredible, edible sinking sponge cake…

Photo Credit: pinstrosity.blogspot.com

These overnight oats...

These overnight oats…

Photo Credit: @emshaer / instagram.com

These heartbreaking yogurt-covered strawberries...

These heartbreaking yogurt-covered strawberries…

Photo Credit: @bbynikkii / instagram.com

This not-so-easy mac...

This not-so-easy mac…

Photo Credit: pinstrosity.blogspot.com

This candy corn cookie calamity...

This candy corn cookie calamity…

Photo Credit: @clarissafidler / instagram.com

These unmotivated paleo cinnamon rolls...

These unmotivated paleo cinnamon rolls…

Photo Credit: pinterestfail.com

These stained-glass cookies...

These stained-glass cookies…

Photo Credit: pinterestfail.com

These inappropriate corn dog muffins...

These inappropriate corn dog muffins…

Photo Credit: @atnejem / instagram.com

This rainbow cupcake mistake...

This rainbow cupcake mistake…

Photo Credit: pinstrosity.blogspot.com

These broken bacon hearts...

These broken bacon hearts…

Photo Credit: pinterestfail.com

This rainbow cake that rolled a little too hard...

This rainbow cake that rolled a little too hard…

Photo Credit: craftfail.com

This poor, unfortunate watermelon cake...

This poor, unfortunate watermelon cake…

Photo Credit: @tays_got_faith / instagram.com

These doomed mozzarella bites...

These doomed mozzarella bites…

Photo Credit: @kristenestelle / instagram.com

These sad cinnamon bun pancakes...

These sad cinnamon bun pancakes…

Photo Credit: @miss_tarin / instagram.com

This problematic vegan pasta...

This problematic vegan pasta…

Photo Credit: @miss_tarin / instagram.com

enhanced-buzz-680-1387901809-14

These horrifying apple turkeys…

Photo Credit: ataleoftwokteachers.blogspot.com 

This salted caramel pretzel meltdown...

This salted caramel pretzel meltdown…

Photo Credit: pinterestfail.com

This attempt at Rice Krispie patriotism...

This attempt at Rice Krispie patriotism…

Photo Credit: @lizhorton217 / instagram.com

This 14-layer caketastrophe...

This 14-layer caketastrophe…

Photo Credit: pinstrosity.blogspot.com

These would-be quinoa pancakes...

These would-be quinoa pancakes…

Photo Credit: @mamabickler / instagram.com

This Sour Patch Situation...

This Sour Patch Situation…

Photo Credit: statigr.am

 This…cake...

This…cake…

Photo Credit: @emig56 / instagram.com

 The peanut butter cup cookies that couldn’t...

The peanut butter cup cookies that couldn’t…

Photo Credit: @laurietani / instagram.com

This rather ineleggant breakfast...

This rather ineleggant breakfast…

Photo Credit: @ladycokonut / instagram.com

These bunny blobscuits...

These bunny blobscuits…

Photo Credit: @xtremeparnthood / instagram.com

 

Have you ever tried candied bacon? 

Ahhh bacon… life is so much better, and loads yummier with bacon. Gone are the days where bacon is only reserved for breakfast. There are now so many creative ways in which this tasty piece of meat can be eaten. Here are 10 unconventional ways you can prepare and enjoy bacon!

Source: Pemzo

1. Bacon Cinnamon Rolls

1

2

Photo Credit: tablespoon.com via  Pemzo

2. Candied Bacon

3

Photo Credit: theclevercarrot.com via  Pemzo

3. Bacon Pancakes

4

Photo Credit: Pemzo

4. Bacon Jam

5

Photo Credit: tastykitchen.com via Pemzo

5. Bacon Wrapped Hot Dogs

6

Photo Credit: Pemzo

6. Bacon Wrapped Lobster Appetizers

7

Photo Credit: Pemzo

7. Bacon Weave Quesadilla

8

Photo Credit: dudefoods.com via Pemzo

8. Bacon Wrapped Fries

9

Photo Credit: Pemzo

9. Bacon Weave Taco

10

Photo Credit: dudefoods.com via Pemzo

10. Bacon Guacamole Grilled Cheese Sandwich

11

Photo Credit: Pemzo

Preparing food doesn’t need to be tiresome and boring. It can be fun and creative, if you know where to look for inspiration!

Here are 15 food hacks, awesome alternatives to preparing food in more creative and ingenious ways. These are all fairly simple tips that you can take advantage of when preparing for cookouts and parties.

Your kitchen will never be the same again.

Cookies 'n Cream ice cubes

Cookies ‘n Cream ice cubes

Bacon Cinnamon Rolls

Bacon Cinnamon Rolls

Mandarin Orange Strip

Mandarin Orange Strip

Edible Chocolate Bowl

Edible Chocolate Bowl

Easy way to remove strawberry stems - use a straw!

Easy way to remove strawberry stems – use a straw!

Swirly Cake 101

Swirly Cake 101

Egg in the middle of a burger patty? Yum!

Egg in the middle of a burger patty? Yum!

Ice Cream Sandwich in 3 seconds!

Ice Cream Sandwich in 3 seconds!

Lemon + Peeler = Lemon Flowers!

Lemon + Peeler = Lemon Flowers!

Kick the boring away from your usual breakfast eggs with these creative frying technique!

Kick the boring away from your usual breakfast eggs with these creative frying technique!

Easy Peasy Cheesy Bread

Easy Peasy Cheesy Bread

Use an apple corer to make easy potato wedges

Use an apple corer to make easy potato wedges

No more sticky fingers when licking your favorite summer time popsicle

No more sticky fingers when licking your favorite summer time popsicle

Eating with chopsticks has never been this easy

Eating with chopsticks has never been this easy

Convert your cheap hanger clips into chips clips!

Convert your cheap hanger clips into chips clips!

Story Source Photo Credit: Viral Nova

Lunch is loads of  fun for Abby, thanks to his dad Beau Coffron or better known as Lunchbox Dad who fixes her up delicious and creatively designed lunches everyday for school.

Coffron takes time creating bento-style lunches using healthy food ingredients cut and put together in colorful shapes and mostly depicting cartoon characters as well as popular children’s books such as Dr. Seuss. He also takes inspiration from shows and movies.

In an interview with Huffpost, Coffron beams that his bento-making skills has made him closer to his daughter as he is now able to talk to her more about her interests.

Source: Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

Photo Credit: Lunchboxdad.com via Bored Panda

 

Has a lot of lamb on hand but no grill grate to cook it over with, but you happen to have a shovel and a nice campfire going? Then fret no more, that’s what the art of shovel grilling comes in handy.

According to legend, shovel grilling began when an rancher somewhere in the Australian outback discovered that he can actually use his shovel to grill lamb. So with a good campfire going, he sterilized the blade of his shovel in the hot flames, and placed his salt & pepper seasoned lamb chops on it and grilled away by thrusting the spade directly into the fire.

Sounds easy, right? Shovel grilling can be done over a campfire, wood-burning grill or charcoal grill. Forget about doing it on a gas grill, as that is really pointless.

Here are some tips for shovel grilling:

  • Start with a good hardwood fire. This is great if you have an outdoor fireplace or fire pit. You can also use some natural lumps of charcoal and just add hardwood chunks for flavor.
  • Make sure that your shovel is well made with a flat blade, meaning it is made of steel and not aluminum. Also, make sure that you use that has a long wooden handle and none of those fiberglass or plastic handled ones. If your shovel is brand new, make sure first to scrub off any protective coating or manufacturing oils on the blade. Then you can go ahead and sterilize it into the fire before putting your meat into it. If you are to utilize a used shovel, make sure first that it is rust free and that you thoroughly scrub clean its blade with soapy water before sterilizing in into the fire.
  • Preheating the blade before placing your meat is a good idea as well. You’ll know you’ve pre-heat your blade enough when after sprinkling a few drops of water, they evaporate in 2 to 3 seconds. The reason behind this is that it helps for the surface of your meat to caramelize, as well as helps in preventing your meat from sticking on the blade.
  • Make sure to expose only the blade and metal part of the shovel to the fire to avoid burning the handle.
  • Shovel grilling work bets with 1-inch thick chops such as lamb, pork and veal as well as steaks such as beef, pork, elk and venison. You can also try this method for grilling seafood such as tuna or salmon steaks.

Source: The Huffington Post

If some of your favorite foods were called by their real names, would you actually eat them?

Let’s find out as you go through our list of some of the most popular foods and their real names (plus what they’re really made of or what animal part they came from).

Foie Gras – Engorged duck’s liver

The fancy French name Foie Gras literally means “fat liver” as it is actually taken from force-fed ducks or geese. But not all foie gras comes from force fed bords as some farms also let their ducks go fat naturally.

Rocky Mountain Oysters – Bull calf testicles

You got it right. These breaded and deep-fried morsels of yum usually dipped in sauce are actually bovine gonads, and they are usually that of younger bull calves.

Caviar – Salt-cured fish eggs

This is actually a delicacy often used as a spread or garnish. It is also called as “roe.”

Blue cheese – Moldy coagulated milk curd

The blue in this cheese is not food coloring, it is actually mold. And that is how cheese is made, if you don’t know that yet.

Chitterlings – Stewed pig intestines

These fried or baked delicacy don’t always come from a pig. In other countries, intestines from sheep and cows are also used.

Saffron – Dried reproductive organs of the crocus flower

This is an incredibly rare and really expensive spice that is derived from the flowers of the Crocus Sativus. After the flower’s stigma and style, which is the reproductive organs of the flowers themselves are harvested, it is then dried and used all over the world for cooking.

Scrapple – Spiced loaf of mushed hog offal

This is a classic Pennsylvanian Dutch breakfast. It is made of unused parts of a pig called offal and mixed with cornmeal or flour and shaped to look like a loaf. It is deep fried before being served in individual pieces.

Capers – Pickled flower buds

This is the flower buds from Capparis Spinosa. It is distinctively flavored and often used as a topping. Before being packed in brine or salt, it is first sun-dried.

Bacon – Pig belly strips

You can have it any way – salted, cured, smoked or aged. Either way, it is all pig belly and admit it or not, it is highly addictive.

Escargot – Cooked land snail

They take the edible digestive tracts of some snail species, which are then purged and later on killed. It is then cooked by loading it with butter and garlic before it is crammed back into their shells and served in a fancy plate.

Tripe – Animal stomach

You can have it any way – whether it is beef, pork or lamb. A lot of cuisines all over the world actually use animal stomach in some of their tastiest delicacies.

Gelatin – Protein extract from the skin and bones of animals

Most gelatin is an extraction coming from the natural collagen that is typically found in the leftover carcasses of domesticated animals. And typically as well, gelatin is used in a sheer variety of products.

Sweetbread – Fried or grilled calf gullet

This is not bread, nor is it sweet at all. It is actually made of the thymus or pancreas of animals such as calves, lambs, pigs and cows.

Head Cheese – Head-meat jelly

How to make Head Cheese: get hold of the whole head of your favorite animal, boil it with some vegetables and your favorite seasonings. After it is all soft and mush, strip the head of all its meat and then let it sit. Soon, the natural collagens of the meat will turn it into a jelly then you can start forming it into any shape you want.

Haggis – Sheep organ pudding

This is a traditional Scottish dish and made entirely of a sheep’s heart, liver and lungs. It is also seasoned and flavored with onions and many other seasonings and stuffed into a casing, which is often traditionally coming from the animal’s stomach.

Kombucha – Tea fermented by colony of bacteria and yeast

This suspiciously delicious mildly fizzy drink is made from the symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast that is called SCOBY. How it’s done is it is thrown  into a container, poured with tea and fermented for a while before being drunk.

Veal – Baby cow meat

Veal typically comes from cows, but most often than not it comes from animals that are under a year old, some even as young as a few days old.

Hot Dogs – Tubes of slurried leftover meat

You might think that hotdogs are mainly just casings of ground meat. Well leftover meat, really.

Yogurt – Fermented milk thickened by bacteria

If you throw in a very specific type bacterial culture into milk, it will result into the fermentation of lactose and the production of lactic acid. This is what also gives it its yogurty tartness.

Steak Tartare – Seasoned raw beef

This is simply an uncooked hamburger patty, if you will, complete with the required seasonings and garnished and to continue with the raw factor, often topped with raw egg yolk as well.

Fish sauce – salty fermented fish fluids

This tasty and really salty sauce, used mainly in Asian cooking, is made by packing fresh fish and lots of salt into a box where it is left for months to ferment. After the fish becomes hydrolized, their yummy salty fluids float on top, which is then collected and bottled.

Cottage cheese – Curdled milk chunks

During the cheese-making process, it often leaves both curds (solids) and whey (liquids). Cottage cheese curds are often not pressed, giving it that soupy texture compared to many regular cheeses.

Kimchi – Aged fermented vegetables

This is a traditional Korean side dish. It is made up of a mixed variety of chopped vegetables and placed in jars to be fermented.

Source: The Huffington Post

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